Connect with us

World

Trump Impeached After Capitol Riot, See Charges Labelled Against Him

Published

on

Trump Impeached After Capitol Riot, See Charges Labelled Against Him
Spread the love

President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time Wednesday, charged with “incitement of insurrection” over the deadly mob siege of the Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office.

With the Capitol secured by armed National Guard troops inside and out, the House voted 232-197 to impeach Trump. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump loyalists stormed the U.S. Capitol, urged on by the president’s calls for them to “fight like hell” against the election results.

Ten Republicans fled Trump, joining Democrats who said he needed to be held accountable and warned ominously of a “clear and present danger” if Congress should leave him unchecked before Democrat Joe Biden’s inauguration Jan. 20.

Trump is the only U.S. president to be twice impeached.

The Capitol insurrection stunned and angered lawmakers, who were sent scrambling for safety as the mob descended, and it revealed the fragility of the nation’s history of peaceful transfers of power. The riot also forced a reckoning among some Republicans, who have stood by Trump throughout his presidency and largely allowed him to spread false attacks against the integrity of the 2020 election.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi invoked Abraham Lincoln and the Bible, imploring lawmakers to uphold their oath to defend the Constitution from all enemies, foreign “and domestic.”

She said of Trump: “He must go, he is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love.”

Holed up at the White House, watching the proceedings on TV, Trump took no responsibility for the bloody riot seen around the world, but issued a statement urging “NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind” to disrupt Biden’s ascension to the White House.

In the face of the accusations against him and with the FBI warning of more violence, Trump said, “That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers.”

ALSO READ:  A NEW DAWN FOR MALAWI.

Trump was first impeached by the House in 2019 over his dealings with Ukraine, but the Senate voted in 2020 acquit. He is the first to be impeached twice. None has been convicted by the Senate, but Republicans said Wednesday that could change in the rapidly shifting political environment as officeholders, donors, big business and others peel away from the defeated president.

The soonest Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell would start an impeachment trial is next Tuesday, the day before Trump is already set to leave the White House, McConnell’s office said. The legislation is also intended to prevent Trump from ever running again.

McConnell believes Trump committed impeachable offenses and considers the Democrats’ impeachment drive an opportunity to reduce the divisive, chaotic president’s hold on the GOP, a Republican strategist told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

McConnell told major donors over the weekend that he was through with Trump, said the strategist, who demanded anonymity to describe McConnell’s conversations.

In a note to colleagues Wednesday, McConnell said he had “not made a final decision on how I will vote.”

Unlike his first time, Trump faces this impeachment as a weakened leader, having lost his own reelection as well as the Senate Republican majority.

Even Trump ally Kevin McCarthy, the House Republican leader, shifted his position and said Wednesday the president bears responsibility for the horrifying day at the Capitol.

In making a case for the “high crimes and misdemeanors” demanded in the Constitution, the four-page impeachment resolution approved Wednesday relies on Trump’s own incendiary rhetoric and the falsehoods he spread about Biden’s election victory, including at a rally near the White House on the day of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol.

A Capitol Police officer died from injuries suffered in the riot, and police shot and killed a woman during the siege. Three other people died in what authorities said were medical emergencies. The riot delayed the tally of Electoral College votes that was the last step in finalizing Biden’s victory.

ALSO READ:  Queen's Nephew, Lord Snowdon to divorce in yet more royal family heartache for Queen

Ten Republican lawmakers, including third-ranking House GOP leader Liz Cheney of Wyoming, voted to impeach Trump, cleaving the Republican leadership, and the party itself.

Cheney, whose father is the former Republican vice president, said of Trump’s actions summoning the mob that “there has never been a greater betrayal by a President” of his office.

Trump was said to be livid with perceived disloyalty from McConnell and Cheney.

With the team around Trump hollowed out and his Twitter account silenced by the social media company, the president was deeply frustrated that he could not hit back, according to White House officials and Republicans close to the West Wing who weren’t authorized to speak publicly about private conversations.

From the White House, Trump leaned on Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina to push Republican senators to resist, while chief of staff Mark Meadows called some of his former colleagues on Capitol Hill.

The president’s sturdy popularity with the GOP lawmakers’ constituents still had some sway, and most House Republicans voted not to impeach.

Security was exceptionally tight at the Capitol, with tall fences around the complex. Metal-detector screenings were required for lawmakers entering the House chamber, where a week earlier lawmakers huddled inside as police, guns drawn, barricade the door from rioters.

“We are debating this historic measure at a crime scene,” said Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass.

During the debate, some Republicans repeated the falsehoods spread by Trump about the election and argued that the president has been treated unfairly by Democrats from the day he took office.

Other Republicans argued the impeachment was a rushed sham and complained about a double standard applied to his supporters but not to the liberal left. Some simply appealed for the nation to move on.

ALSO READ:  Speaker Pelosi blames Trump, GOP for deadlock in coronavirus relief negotiations

Rep. Tom McClintock of California said, “Every movement has a lunatic fringe.”

Yet Democratic Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo. and others recounted the harrowing day as rioters pounded on the chamber door trying to break in. Some called it a “coup” attempt.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., contended that Trump was “capable of starting a civil war.”

Conviction and removal of Trump would require a two-thirds vote in the Senate, which will be evenly divided. Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania joined Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska over the weekend in calling for Trump to “go away as soon as possible.”

Fending off concerns that an impeachment trial would bog down his first days in office, Biden is encouraging senators to divide their time between taking taking up his priorities of confirming his nominees and approving COVID-19 relief while also conducting the trial.

The impeachment bill draws from Trump’s own false statements about his election defeat to Biden. Judges across the country, including some nominated by Trump, have repeatedly dismissed cases challenging the election results, and former Attorney General William Barr, a Trump ally, has said there was no sign of widespread fraud.

The House had first tried to persuade Vice President Mike Pence and the Cabinet to invoke their authority under the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. Pence declined to do so, but the House passed the resolution anyway.

The impeachment bill also details Trump’s pressure on state officials in Georgia to “find” him more votes.

While some have questioned impeaching the president so close to the end of his term, there is precedent. In 1876, during the Ulysses Grant administration, War Secretary William Belknap was impeached by the House the day he resigned, and the Senate convened a trial months later. He was acquitted.

AP NEWS

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

World

Trump Fan, Christopher Stanton Commits Suicide After Arrest For Capitol Riot

Published

on

By

Trump Fan, Christopher Stanton Commits Suicide After Arrest For Capitol Riot
Spread the love

DONALD Trump fan reportedly shot himself in the chest and was found dead by his wife after his Capitol riot arrest.

Christopher Stanton Georgia, 53, was charged last week for his involvement in Wednesday’s Capitol chaos, 11-Alive reported.

Christopher Stanton Georgia’s wife found him dead in their basement on Saturday

Georgia was arrested last week

His wife found him on Saturday morning in the basement of their home and told police there was “blood everywhere.”

The father-of-two was found with a gunshot wound to the chest, the Daily Mail reported.

medical examiner ruled that the Alpharetta, Georgia, man died by suicide, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Authorities have not yet commented on a reason why Georgia took his own life.

A police report obtained by The Sun states that Georgia’s family members were “extremely distressed” at the scene.

ALSO READ:  Nigeria Barred From 2022 US Visa Lottery

Georgia’s wife provided gruesome details to cops and said she was searching for a gun.

Police reportedly confiscated two semi-automatic SKS rifles from Georgia’s home.

On the day of the Capitol riots, Georgia had stayed out past the 6pm curfew after police officers told Trump fans to leave around 7.15pm, court documents showed.

He was charged with attempting to “enter certain property, that is, the United States Capitol Grounds, against the will of the United States Capitol Police,” the police report states.

Georgia faced a maximum penalty of a $1,000 fine and/or up to 180 days in jail.

The Trump supporter reportedly worked at the North Carolina-based banking company BB&T, as a regional portfolio manager.

Georgia apparently began working in finance after selling hairpieces in the 1990s.

ALSO READ:  Michael Strahan claims that his ex-wife physically and emotionally abuses their twin teenage daughters,

His neighbor, Jace Carreras, described him as a “loving father” who “always had a smile and loved cutting his own grass.”

“I never heard him speak badly to anyone about anyone,” Carreras said.

Meanwhile, Ellen Burbage, whose daughter Lisa was once married to Georgia for less than a year, said he did not come off as political when they knew him.

“He wasn’t political at all then that I remember but that was not a political time, times have changed,” Burbage said.

She added that she was “thrilled my daughter could see she had made a huge mistake,” and was “glad” to not see him again after the divorce.

We didn’t think he was the right person for her to marry, she was just out of college and I thought he was a very bad influence on her,” Burbage said.

ALSO READ:  Adnan Bostaji, Saudi Arabia Ambassador To Nigeria Dies In His Sleep

Georgia is the sixth person reported dead since MAGA fans broke into the Capitol building to try to stop Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

The Trump supporters who died have been identified as Ashli Babbitt, 35, Roseanne Boyland, 34, Kevin Greeson, 55, and Benjamin Phillips, 50.

Capitol Police officer Brian D. Sicknick died after being hit in the head with a fire extinguisher.

On Sunday, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser asked President Donald Trump for an emergency declaration, which lets the government increase powers in a specific area.

Trump on Monday issued the emergency declaration and ordered federal agencies to provide assistance to local law enforcement, amid fears of more unrest as Biden’s Inauguration Day approaches.

Continue Reading

World

Drug Ring: Philippine Police Kill Nigerian, Chukwuma During Sting Operation

Published

on

By

Drug Ring: Philippine Police Kill Nigerian, Chukwuma During Sting Operation
Spread the love

A Nigerian national, Christopher Chukwuma, suspected of leading a drug ring has been shot dead during a raid on Monday in a hotel in the village of Bagong Ilog in Pasig City, the Philippines police personnel.

Chukwuma, a resident of Angeles City in Pampanga, was killed because he allegedly fought back the arresting officers, RMN reports.

An undercover cop had pretended to be an interested client and met the suspect in the hotel where he was staying.

During the meeting, the suspect became suspicious of the undercover agent, prompting the rest of the police force to attack Chukwuma’s lair.

The cops allegedly discovered PHP13.6 million (US$283,000) worth of meth in his possession.

ALSO READ:  TikTok might not be getting banned in the U.S. – but it could be bought instead.

Chukwuma is allegedly the leader of a gang composed of fellow Nigerians who sell drugs in different parts of Luzon.

The police have arrested other Nigerians in Las Piñas and Pampanga’s drug raids.

Thousands of drug suspects are dead in the name of the Duterte government’s drug war, with the police saying that they had been killed because they allegedly fought back.

However, human rights groups have alleged that some of the suspects were unarmed.

The incident in the Philippines is coming about two weeks after protests erupted in Dublin, the Irish capital, over the police killing of a 27-year-old Nigerian, George Nkencho, in the Manorfields Drive area, near the Dublin/Meath border.

ALSO READ:  Speaker Pelosi blames Trump, GOP for deadlock in coronavirus relief negotiations

Nkencho who went to the Hartstown Shopping Centre at around 12.15 pm.
In two instances, the police had stated that he had threatened members of the public with a knife.

But multiple videos taken by members of the public in the moments leading up to his death had shown otherwise.

One of the videos shows the 27-year-old, who it is understood had experienced mental health issues, walk across a green area and followed by marked and unmarked Garda cars.

Continue Reading

World

Donald Trump Impeachment Resolution (Full Text)

Published

on

By

Donald Trump Impeachment Resolution
Spread the love

Resolution

Impeaching Donald John Trump, President of the United States, for high crimes and misdemeanors.

Resolved, That Donald John Trump, President of the United States, is impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors and that the following article of impeachment be exhibited to the United States Senate:

Article of impeachment exhibited by the House of Representatives of the United States of America in the name of itself and of the people of the United States of America, against Donald John Trump, President of the United States of America, in maintenance and support of its impeachment against him for high crimes and misdemeanors.
Article 1: Incitement of insurrection

The Constitution provides that the House of Representatives “shall have the sole Power of Impeachment” and that the President “shall be removed from Office on Impeachment, for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” Further, section 3 of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution prohibits any person who has “engaged in insurrection or rebellion against” the United States from “hold[ing] and office … under the United States.’ In his conduct while President of the United States – and in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, provide, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed – Donald John Trump engaged in high Crimes and Misdemeanors by inciting violence against the Government of the United States, in that:

ALSO READ:  TikTok might not be getting banned in the U.S. – but it could be bought instead.

On January 6, 2021, pursuant to the 12th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, the House of Representatives, and the Senate met at the United States Capitol for a Joint Session of Congress to count the votes of the Electoral College.

In the months preceding the Joint Session, President Trump repeatedly issued false statements asserting that the Presidential election results were the product of widespread fraud and should not be accepted by the American people or certified by State or Federal officials.

Shortly before the Joint Session commenced, President Trump, addressed a crowd at the Ellipse in Washington, D.C. There, he reiterated false claims that “we won this election, and we won it by a landslide.” He also willfully made statements that, in context, encouraged – and foreseeably resulted in – lawless action at the Capitol, such as: “if you don’t fight like hell you’re not going to have a country any more.”

ALSO READ:  Nigeria Barred From 2022 US Visa Lottery

Thus incited by President Trump, members of the crowd he had addressed, in an attempt to, among other objectives, interfere with the Joint Session’s solemn constitutional duty to certify the results of the 2020 Presidential election, unlawfully breached and vandalized the Capitol, injured and killed law enforcement personnel, menaced Members of Congress, the Vice President, and Congressional personnel, and engaged in other violent, deadly, destructive and seditious acts.

resident Trump’s conduct on January 6, 2021, followed his prior efforts to subvert and obstruct the certification of the results of the 2020 Presidential election. Those prior efforts included a phone call on January 2, 2021, during which President Trump urged the secretary of state of Georgia, Brad Raffensperger, to “find” enough votes to overturn the Georgia Presidential election results and threatened Secretary Raffensperger if he failed to do so.

ALSO READ:  Covid-19: Finland Records First Death

In all this, President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government. He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transition of power, and imperiled a coequal branch of Government. He thereby betrayed his trust as President, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.

Wherefore, Donald John Trump, by such conduct, has demonstrated that he will remain a threat to national security, democracy, and the Constitution if allowed to remain in office, and has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self-governance and the rule of law. Donald John Trump thus warrants impeachment and trial, removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.

Continue Reading

Trending