Connect with us

World

Guinea President Names Street After Buhari For His ‘fear Of God’

Published

on

Guinea President Names Street After Buhari For His ‘fear Of God’
Spread the love

President Umaro Embalo has expressed appreciation to President Buhari for his support and the fatherly advice he had been receiving from him before and after his inauguration as president of Guinea Bissau.

President Embalo explained that he named a street in Bissau, capital of Guinea Bissau, after President Buhari as a mark of honour and respect he has for the Nigerian leader due to his honesty, discipline and fear of God.

On his part, President Macky Sall of Senegal commended the way and manner Nigeria is supporting the cost of war against insurgency and terrorist activities in all the Lake Chad Basin areas.

The Senegalese leader gave the commendation at the end of a dinner meeting with President Muhammadu Buhari and President Umaro Embalo of Guinea Bissau at the Presidential Villa, Abuja, on Thursday night.

He also lauded Nigeria for supporting the efforts of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) toward the restoration of peace and constitutional order in Mali.

He said, “What I can say on Mali is that I did know that ECOWAS was very involved since the beginning (of the political crisis). Of course Mali is one of our great countries in ECOWAS.

“As you know, Mali is under occupation by terrorists, even Niger Republic, and I want to salute the great action of Nigeria against Boko Haram and how Nigeria is supporting the cost of war even in all the Lake Chad Basin area.

*“Nigeria is also supporting ECOWAS including Mali, Niger and in Burkina Faso where we have a very serious situation.”

Sall reiterated the commitment of the ECOWAS leaders to continue to support the transitional government in Mali to enable it meet the December 2021 deadline of conducting elections in that country.

The visiting president said: “Although, we had a big political crisis in Mali, but hopefully today everything there is better as we continue to give support to the country’s transitional arrangements.

“So we will help and we will continue to support and we hope by the end of December of next year they will come back to the normal constitutional order and they will have elections and they can come back very strongly with the nations of ECOWAS.

“So, what I can say is today everybody is helping Mali, we lifted the sanctions and ECOWAS has shown a big leadership during this crisis.’’

The Senegalese leader further revealed that they had fruitful bilateral talks with President Buhari bordering on security, economic, COVID-19 as well as regional and global issues.

“I’m not here for summit. I came with my young brother, President Embalo, to pay this visit, to discuss with him (President Buhari), of course, about bilateral relations and also about the region, Africa, about the COVID-19 and all problems we are having in this world.

“So, let me thank President Buhari for hosting us on African traditional way and it’s a big honour for me again to tell him; `thank you President Buhari, thank you for hospitality; thank you also for the officials you brought this evening.’


Spread the love
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

World

Ankhi Das: Facebook India’s policy head quits amid hate speech row

Published

on

Ankhi Das: Facebook India's policy head quits amid hate speech row
Spread the love

Facebook India’s policy head Ankhi Das has resigned two months after the social media giant was embroiled in a hate speech controversy in the country.

The Wall Street Journal had accused Facebook of going easy on ruling party supporters who allegedly violated hate speech rules with anti-Muslim posts.

The paper also alleged that Ms Das had made the controversial decisions and was politically partisan.

Facebook denied the allegations and said it did not favour any party.

But the row put the company in a delicate position in its biggest market. Its head of business for India, Ajit Mohan, was later grilled by an Indian parliamentary committee.

Mr Mohan said in a statement on Tuesday that Ms Das had stepped down from her role in Facebook to pursue “her interest in public service”.

He added that Ms Das, who was one of the company’s first employees in India, had “played an instrumental role” in its growth and had made “enormous contributions”.
She made headlines in August when a Wall Street Journal report alleged that Facebook deleted some anti-Muslim posts by a lawmaker from the governing Bharatiya Janata Party only after the paper asked about them.

Ms Das was at the centre of the controversy as she allegedly made the decision not to delete these posts.

According to the paper, Ms Das told employees that “punishing violations by politicians from Mr Modi’s [Prime Minister Narendra Modi] party would damage the company’s business prospects in the country”.

The paper also alleged that similar posts by at least three others, who supported the BJP, were not taken down even after they were flagged for violating the company’s hate speech rules.

Ms Das was then the subject of a second report by the WSJ, which alleged that she supported the BJP and Mr Modi, while denigrating the opposition parties in internal messages.

Facebook, however, denied it favoured any political party, and said these messages were taken out of context.


Spread the love
Continue Reading

World

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting

Published

on

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting
Spread the love

Hundreds of protesters in Philadelphia have marched through the city for a second night, demanding racial justice after police fatally shot a black man.

The family of Walter Wallace, 27, say he was suffering a mental health crisis when officers opened fire on him.

Police say they shot him because he wouldn’t drop a knife he was holding.

Police reinforcements as well as the National Guard have been deployed. Officials say 30 officers were hurt during the first night of clashes.

The city’s police have also accused protesters of looting and ransacking businesses during the unrest.

Mr Wallace had bipolar disorder, and his wife told officers this before they shot him, a lawyer representing his family said.
On Tuesday night, the marches began peacefully but became more confrontational as the evening drew on.

Officers in riot gear arrived in squad cars, on bicycles and on buses, and used their bikes to shove protesters back from barricade lines.

Police also warned residents to stay away from the riverfront Port Richmond district as widespread looting occurred.


Spread the love
Continue Reading

World

US election: Biden hits new battleground, Trump blitzes Midwest

Published

on

US election: Biden hits new battleground, Trump blitzes Midwest
Spread the love

In Georgia, Mr Biden said that Mr Trump’s handling of coronavirus amounted to a “capitulation”.

Mr Trump kept blitzing the swing states that he won in 2016, warning in Michigan that its “economic survival” was on the line if Mr Biden won.

According to opinion polls, Mr Trump lags behind with a week to go.

But the race is tighter in critical battleground states such as Arizona, Florida and North Carolina.

More than 69 million people have already voted early by post or in person in a record-breaking surge driven mainly by the coronavirus pandemic.
On Tuesday, Mr Trump held rallies in Nebraska and two states he snatched from Democrats in 2016: Michigan and Wisconsin.

In Lansing, Michigan’s capital, he warned: “This election is a matter of economic survival for Michigan.”

And he told suburban women, a demographic that many opinion polls suggest he is struggling to win over: “Your husbands, they want to get back to work, right? We’re getting your husbands back to work.”

Before leaving the White House, the president renewed his criticism of postal ballots – more than 46 million of which have been cast so far.

The huge volume of mail-in votes, which could take days or weeks to tally, means a winner is not certain to be known on election night next week.

“It would be very, very proper and very nice if a winner were declared on November 3, instead of counting ballots for two weeks, which is totally inappropriate,” Mr Trump told reporters before heading to the Midwest.


Spread the love
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending

%d bloggers like this: